Changing behaviour of people with Alzheimers

Mindaugas from Aichom

Loved ones that start developing dementia due to Alzheimer's disease or other causes start changing their behaviour, too. What are the things family caregivers notice and how they might change your life?

Loved ones that start developing dementia due to Alzheimer's disease or other causes start changing their behaviour, too. What are the things family caregivers notice and how they might change your life? 


Let's dive in and learn about:


  1. Recent memory loss

  2. Emotional connection

  3. Who is the liar?

  4. Hallucinations


When dementia comes to live with your loved one, one's oldest memories are the last to succumb to the condition. If your loved one starts forgetting the fact that you are one's relative, trying to connect with the person based on your memories or the fact that you are relatives will inevitably be frustrating for both of you.


It is important to understand that people with memory loss do not like being quizzed much, and what matters to them - is the emotional connection to you. Gently ask about their favourite music, favourite movies, things the person loves to do or talk about - you will create the emotional bond which is helpful for you and your loved one.


People with dementia begin and continue forgetting things such as location of their household items and important, valuable personal belonging, which results in them searching for those who "stole" it, usually calling relatives "liars" and always looking for suspects. The best thing to do is ask these people to tell stories about when they were younger - live more in the past as opposed to living in the present. 


Such conversations might result in learning about how the person was used to keep important personal items sorted, and also build the emotional connection between both of you.

Hallucinations can happen for people with dementia, especially, due to Lewy Body dementia (rather than Alzheimer's disease). 


They might be regular and increase with time, a neurologist can help with medications that help to keep hallucinations under control. Understand that your loved one experiencing hallucinations (usually visual and audible), believes they are real. Denying their "reality" would have no outcomes. Try to join the "real" experience, by improvising and then navigating the situation to something safe and calming - some other topic, environment.


If you are still learning about dementia, make it colourful by watching a movie. 


Did you like the list? Download the Aichom app and find more advices ont taking care people with Alzheimers.